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Professor and Chair, Anthropology and Sociology
David Baronov
Education:

Ph.D., SUNY-Binghamton

Dr. Baronov has three decades of experience working within and researching public health. Beginning in the early 1990s, he as worked and served in a variety of capacities, including chair of the CDC’s Behavioral Social Science Volunteers Program; external grants reviewer for the CDC; director of program development and evaluation with Fundación SIDA in San Juan, Puerto Rico; data analyst with the Puerto Rican Department of Anti-Addiction Service; member of the Seattle/King County HIV Prevention Planning Board (serving as the behavioral scientist); and co-chair of the Assessment Committee for the Rochester Area Task Force on AIDS.

His research and scholarship within public health includes the impact of HIV/AIDS in Puerto Rico and in Mozambique; the introduction and acculturation of biomedicine in East Africa; imposing public health behavioral change models on colonial settings; the social ontology of biomedicine; the role of traditional healers within healthcare in Kenya; the public health needs of mountain villages in Myanmar; and the impact of contemporary applications of science and technology within African public health settings.

Dr. Baronov’s current research explores adaptations of Western public health models in non-Western societies as well as the consequences of applying quantitative measures to qualitative phenomena within public health practice.