Events Calendar

School of Arts and Sciences Panel: History of Asian-American Hate Crime

Faculty in the School of Arts and Sciences will offer a virtual panel discussion about Asian-American hate crimes and offer a forum for a better understanding of its complex history.

Date: April 13, 2021 - April 13, 2021
Time: 4:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.
Location: Zoom

Hosted by the School of Arts and Sciences

Zoom link: https://sjfc.zoom.us/j/98905104541

Meeting ID 989 0510 4541

About the Discussion

On May 6, 1882, President Chester A. Arthur signed the “Chinese Exclusion Act” into law. This was the first piece of immigration law that aimed to exclude an entire racial or national group from entering the United States. The Act was meant to last 10 years but was extended by the Geary Act of 1892, effectively limiting all legal immigration from China until the Act was lifted in 1943 during WWII.

The Exclusion Act was the basis for laws curtailing or limiting immigration of peoples of Japanese, Hindu, Indian, Sikh and Middle Eastern descent and emphasized a policy focused on citizenship that was restricted to white people. Immigration policies were not reformed until the 1965& Immigration and Nationality Act which removed the formula for restricting immigration on the basis of nationality.

Fear that Chinese immigrants would cross the southern and northern borders led to the construction of the first border walls, especially at the southern border of the U.S. As Erika Lee writes in her article, Chinese Exclusion at the Borders with Canada and Mexico, “Chinese immigration to and exclusion from the United States had transnational consequences that transformed the norther and southern borders into sites of contest over illegal immigration, race, citizenship, immigration policy and the important of the Chinese diaspora in the Americas” (55).

As we collectively mourn the murders of Soon Chung Park; Hyun Jung Grant; Suncha Kim; Yong Ae Yue; Delaina Ashley Yaun; Paul Andre Michels; Xiaojie Tan; and Daoyou Feng, we turn to our mission statement at Fisher and the critical importance of goodness and knowledge in this difficult time:

As an institution of higher learning, we engage our students in the quest for knowledge and truth, believing that such engagement will equip them to make sound judgments as individuals, family members, and citizens. We provide individual guidance to students as they strive for academic excellence and develop values that will guide them in meaningful and productive lives. Our dual emphasis on intellectual and personal growth derives from our belief that learning is valuable for its own sake, for the sake of those who learn, and for the sake of society as a whole.

Faculty in the School of Arts and Sciences will offer a virtual panel discussion about Asian-American hate crimes and offer a forum for a better understanding of the complex history that has led to this moment.