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School Student Learning Outcomes Statements

Student learning outcomes statements clearly state the expected knowledge, skills, attitudes, competencies, and habits of mind that students are expected to acquire at an institution of higher education.

The links below show by school the student learning outcomes from each of the departments and/or programs at St. John Fisher College.

School of Arts and Sciences

Biology

1: Biology majors will achieve proficiency in Biology through the study of foundational concepts in the field. (Aligns to ACLOs: Inquiry and Analysis; Content and Discourse in Field; and Integrative and Applied Learning)

Biology majors will understand:

  • the origin of diversity and the processes that drive evolutionary change and adaptation.
  • that structure defines function in all living things.
  • the flow, exchange, modification, and storage of genetic information.
  • how energy is transferred and matter is transformed through biological systems.
  • how complex biological systems are interconnected.

2: Biology majors will be critical and creative thinkers. (Aligns to ACLOs: Inquiry and Analysis; Content and Discourse in Field; and Integrative and Applied Learning)

Biology majors will:

  • be able to apply techniques and tools to the process of scientific inquiry.
  • understand and apply relevant information literacy skills.
  • employ appropriate qualitative and quantitative analyses and models.
  • propose original research that applies the scientific method through a multidisciplinary lens.
  • identify problems, troubleshoot effective solutions, and reflect on the process.

3: Biology majors will understand the interrelatedness among Biology, society, and the environment. (Aligns to ACLOs: Inquiry and Analysis; Ethical Reasoning; Written, Oral, and Visual Communication; Citizenship and Civic Engagement; and Integrative and Applied Learning)

Biology majors will:

  • evaluate how Biology informs and is impacted by societal and environmental matters.
  • apply conceptual knowledge to address societal and environmental challenges.
  • understand and practice ethically responsible and professional conduct.
  • communicate scientific information to all audiences in an accurate and engaging fashion.
  • explore their potential to impact the world through their actions and career choices.
Chemistry

1: Students will have knowledge and understanding of the theoretical basis of chemistry (Aligns to ACLOs: Content and Discourse of Field)

  • Be able to connect observations with prior information: prediction of chemical reaction products.
  • Explain the physical and/or chemical properties of substances based on an understanding of atomic and molecular structure.
  • Be able to organize relevant data for analysis by applying appropriate theories and/or mathematical relationships.

2: Students will demonstrate competency in laboratory work (Aligns to ACLOs: Inquiry and Analysis; Content and Discourse in Field; and Integrative and Applied Learning)

  • Be able to explain the purpose of the steps in a laboratory procedure
  • Design and modify experimental procedure(s) that is/are appropriate to the goal(s) of an investigation.
  • Identify, collect, organize, analyze, and interpret experimental data and any associated experimental errors.
  • Students will formulate an explanation of observations and will be able to apply theories to illustrate how observations can be understood.
  • Use standard laboratory equipment, instrumentation, and chemicals properly and safely in a laboratory setting.

3: Students will be able to apply quantitative reasoning skills and critical thinking to problem solving. (Aligns to ACLOs: Inquiry and Analysis)

  • Apply an appropriate equation(s) to complete quantitative calculations with the correct number of significant figures and units and be able to explain the validity of the results. Be able to draw conclusions from quantitative values and correlate quantitative results to chemical and/or physical properties of the system.

4: Be able to evaluate and interpret chemical studies (Aligns to ACLOs: Inquiry and Analysis, Written, Oral, and Visual Communication)

  • Locate relevant literature; assess the significance of source material. Organize a clear, concise report in a format chosen by the instructor.
  • Evaluate the conclusions of scientific investigations performed by others.
  • Identify and discuss the interaction between the theme(s) of the course with another discipline(s) and/or the world around us.
Computer Science

1: Students will understand the capabilities, limitations, and ramifications (technical, ethical, social) of computing, the state of art, and the current research and developments in computer sciences and related areas. (Aligns with ACLOs: Content and Discourse of the Field, Ethical Reasoning)

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the various ethical issues associated with modern computing technologies.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the various social issues involved with current “hacktivism” movements, such as Anonymous or WikiLeaks

2: Students will understand and analyze end-user needs, master the techniques of creating and applying algorithms and data structures, and analyze their viability. Students prove mathematical conjectures using mathematical arguments. (Aligns with ACLOs: Inquiry and Analysis, Integrative and Applied Learning)

  • Create various software projects, given a specification, using various algorithms and data structures
  • Analyze software projects in terms of usability, efficiency, and/or correctness and be able to modify software projects using this analysis

3: Students will be effective at working individually and in teams, building on the work of others, and be able to communicate technical information with both experts and non-experts. (Aligns with ACLOs: Written, Oral, and Visual Communication, Collaboration
and Leadership, Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion)

  • Both individually and within a group, write clear, concise, and accurate technical documents following industry standards for technical and non-technical audiences.
  • Both individually and within a group, effectively present a clear overview of a software project for mixed audiences (both technical and non-technical).

4: Students will be prepared to adapt to new hardware and/or software technologies and new and changing application area through a firm grasp of fundamental principles and to develop an appreciation of the needs for life-long learning. (Aligns with ACLOs: Integrative and Applied Learning)

  • Apply existing knowledge to learn to develop software within a system, environment, or programming language, which has not been taught as part of a formal course.

5: Students will appreciate both the demands and range of opportunities of the computing profession and provide for and encourage creative contribution to the art. (Aligns with ACLOs: Content and Discourse of the Field, Citizenship and Civic Engagement)

  • Demonstrate proficiency in a variety of different areas of computer sciences.
  • Create various software in a variety of different areas of computer science.
Criminology and Criminal Justice

1: Students will become knowledgeable of the body of scholarship (foundational and current) associated with the fields of criminology and criminal justice. (Aligns with ACLOs: Content and Discourse of the Field; Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion)

  • Demonstrate comprehension of the major scholarly works associated with early and current criminology and criminal justice.
  • Articulate the major thoughts in criminology.
  • Describe the various models to analyze criminal justice administration including but not limited to systems perspective and the due process/crime control model.
  • Evince an understanding of the substantive differences between the fields of criminology and criminal justice

2: Students will be able to describe the difficulties associated with acquiring valid and empirical data on the nature and extent of crime. (Aligns with ACLOs: Inquiry and Analysis; Ethical Reasoning)

  • Describe the most used measures of crime available
  • Recognize the strengths and weaknesses of each crime measure.

3: Students will be able to delineate the different agencies and steps involved in crime processing. (Aligns with ACLOs: Citizenship and Civic Engagement; Written, Oral, and Visual Communication)

  • Identify and discuss the agencies that comprise the criminal justice system.
  • Illustrate the steps and activities used by each of the agencies in responding to and processing of crime.

4: Students will be able to describe the major concepts, perspectives, and methodological traditions used by scholars in the field of criminology and criminal justice. (Aligns with ACLOs: Inquiry and Analysis; Integrative and Applied Learning)

  • Evince and understanding of the major concepts and perspectives associated with the disciplines of criminology and criminal justice.
  • Assess and apply the major methodologies used to study crime and the administration of criminal justice.

5: Students will know the current issues confronting criminal justice and the importance of maintaining an objective, bias-free perspective when examining them, using evidence-based research when available. (Aligns with ACLOs: Collaboration and Leadership; Citizenship and Civic Engagement; Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion)

  • Describe the current issues confronting criminal justice, recognizing the complexity, dynamics, and context of each.
  • Acknowledge the role of the media in shaping the beliefs and opinions of an uninformed public.
  • Recognize and describe the importance of evidence-based research in understanding and changing the process/system of criminal justice in this country.
Cybersecurity

1: Students will have a wealth of hands-on, practical experience in current cybersecurity tools and technologies. (Aligns with ACLOs: Discourse and Content of the Field, Ethical Reasoning)

  • Understand the techniques, tools, and theoretical knowledge to keep a network secure
  • Understand the techniques, tools, and theoretical knowledge to keep a database system secure
  • Perform a digital forensic analysis when a cybercrime has occurred
  • Identify within software risks such as malware, viruses, worms, Trojan horses, and ransomware, among others
  • Perform basic ethical hacking to ensure a network is secure

2: Students will have a theoretical understanding of both basic and advanced cybersecurity principles. (Aligns with ACLO: Discourse and Content of the Field)

  • Be capable of writing basic programs in a limited number of currently used languages to configure and enhance system security
  • Have a mathematical knowledge sufficient to be able to analyze incidents and events

3: Students will have a strong foundational IT knowledge necessary for understanding cybersecurity theories, tools, and technologies. (Aligns with ACLO: Inquiry and Analysis)

  • Have a foundational knowledge, both practical and theoretical, of basic information
  • technology, including:
    • Programming
    • Computer Architecture
    • Operating Systems
    • Networking
    • Databases

4: Students will have a knowledge of the legal and business issues with respect to cybersecurity. (Aligns with ACLO: Integrative and Applied Learning)

  • Perform Risk Management assessments and Risk Mitigation plans with respect to new and existing technologies
  • Craft policies to strengthen an entity’s cybersecurity defense
Economics

1: Students will demonstrate an advanced knowledge of economic concepts. (Aligns with ACLO: Discourse and Content of the Field)

2: Students will effectively apply economic methods, concepts, and tools to policy issues and decision-making. (Aligns with ACLOs: Integrative and Applied Learning; Collaboration and Leadership; Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion)

3: Students will demonstrate proficiency in quantitative methods and utilize statistical techniques to investigate economic and social phenomenon. (Aligns with ACLO: Inquiry and Analysis)

4: Students will clearly and coherently articulate persuasive economic arguments and reasoning orally, in writing, and visually. (Aligns with ACLO: Written, Oral, and Visual Communication)

5: Students will participate in experiential and hands-on projects to demonstrate mastery of economic analysis. (Aligns with ACLO: Citizenship and Civic Engagement)

English

1: Students will be able to understand and analyze texts. (Aligns with ACLOs: Inquiry and Analysis; Written, Oral, and Visual Communication; Discourse and Content of the Field)

2: Students will learn to use evidence to support a well-developed, well-written argument. (Aligns with ACLO: Integrative and Applied Learning)

3: Students will understand how cultural and historical contexts shape the meaning of language and texts, including those by marginalized writers. (Aligns with ACLOs: Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion; Ethical Reasoning)

4: Students will communicate effectively through contemporary media. (Aligns with ACLO: Written, Oral, and Visual Communication)

5: Students will acquire and implement strategies for competent writing in a variety of genres. (Aligns with ACLOs: Discourse and Content of the Field; Written, Oral, and Visual Communication; Citizenship and Civic Engagement)

History

1: Students will engage in historical inquiry, research, and analysis. (Aligns with ACLOs: Inquiry and Analysis; Ethical Reasoning; Written, Oral, and Visual Communication)

  • Build historical knowledge
  • Use resources appropriately

2: Students will have the skills and knowledge to craft historical narrative and argument. (Aligns with ACLOs: Inquiry and Analysis; Integrative and Applied Learning)

  • Create historical arguments and narratives

3: Students will be well practices in historical thinking (Aligns with ACLOs: Content and Discourse of Field, Inquiry and Analysis)

  • Develop historical methods.
  • Recognize the provisional nature of knowledge, the disciplinary preference for complexity, and the comfort with ambiguity that history requires.
  • Apply the range of skills it takes to decode the historical record because of its incomplete, complex, and contradictory nature.

4: Students will use historical perspectives as central to active citizenship. (Aligns with ACLO: Citizenship and Civic Engagement)

  • Apply historical knowledge and historical thinking to contemporary issues
  • Develop positions that reflect deliberation, cooperation, and diverse perspectives
Interactive Media

1: Students will have the skills and knowledge to code in a variety of languages related to interactive media development (Aligns with ACLOs: Discourse and Content of Field; Integrative and Applied Learning)

  • Students will learn the syntax and techniques of coding, including an understanding of logic, statements, functions, and objects
  • Students will be able to use code in order to create a professional, fully realized, and unique project.

2: Students will learn techniques for designing and creating web and mobile sites and/or video games for a variety of commercial, journalistic, and artistic purposes. (Aligns with ACLO: Discourse and Content of Field)

  • Students will become familiar with graphic design and be able to apply design theory to real-world projects.
  • Students will develop an understanding of information design and usability as it applies to interactive media projects.

3: Students will demonstrate skills in statistical, quantitative, and computing methods to solve research problems. (Aligns with ACLO: Inquiry and Analysis)

  • Students will utilize coding and software tools to analyze and present data in a professional manner that could be translated to web-based or app-based media.
  • Students will apply the methodologies of critical analysis, content analysis, or ethnography to write an academic analysis of an issue related to digital cultures.
  • Students will write at ta level suitable for a public audience in an area related to interactive media (e.g., technical writing, game writing, writing for social media, presentation of a CV)
  • Students will analyze the cultural significance of media texts as they relate to issues of race,, class, global cultures, and/or gender.

4: Students will write about issues related to digital cultures and digital technologies. (Aligns with ACLOs: Diversity, Equity and Inclusion; Applied and Integrative Learning)

Mathematics

1: Students will use logic and insight to analyze problems, develop solution strategies, implement their strategies, interpret their results, and reflect on the entire process to see how it might be improved and generalized. (Aligns with ACLOs: Content and Discourse of the Field, Inquiry and Analysis)

  • Students are able to solve practical, quantitative problems and reflect upon the process
  • Analytical, numerical, visual, and verbal strategies are applied to problem-solving appropriately.
  • Students are able to solve abstract mathematical problems and reflect upon the process

2: Students extend their abilities to develop, refine, and prove mathematical conjectures. (Aligns with ACLO: Inquiry and Analysis)

  • Prove mathematical conjectures using a mathematical argument
  • Students pose and refine mathematical conjectures based on evidence.
  • Students critique proof-based thinking.

3: Students develop an understanding of connections between mathematics courses, among topics within single courses, and between mathematics and other disciplines, particularly the natural and social sciences

  • Individuals and teams build mathematical models to deepen their understanding of mathematics and gain insight into the application area
  • Individuals and teams evaluate mathematical models developed by themselves and others in order to improve the models and gain insight.
Media and Communication

1: Students will demonstrate the ability to think critically and analytically about media and communication from cultural, technological, and economic perspectives. (Aligns with ACLOs: Inquiry and Analysis; Integrative and Applied Learning; Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion)

  • Students will evaluation media history from cultural, technological, and economic perspectives
  • Students will apply research (quantitative/qualitative/legal) to develop skills of critical thinking and analysis in order to solve industry or academic-orientated programs. Students will analyze the cultural significance of media texts as they relate to issues of race, class, global cultures, and/or gender.

2: Students will have strong verbal and presentation skills. (Aligns with ACLOs: Written, Oral, and Visual Communication; Content and Discourse of Field)

  • Students will demonstrate the ability to prepare and present an oral presentation or performance in a way that displays an understanding of their audience and confidence in their delivery.
  • Students will write grammatically correct and in the appropriate professional manner with a specific purpose for an intended audience.

3: Students will have strong skills in writing. (Aligns with ACLOs: Written, Oral, and Visual Communication; Content and Discourse of Field)

4: Students will demonstrate skills in visual production and communication technologies (Aligns with ACLO: Discourse and Content of Field)

  • Students will develop an understanding of the formal (aesthetic) aspects of design and visual communication.
  • Students will demonstrate cross-platform (web, mobile, broadcast, video, print) storytelling skills.
Media Management

1: Students will identify and analyze problems and create strategic solutions by applying knowledge and research of media industries. (Aligns with ACLOs: Integrative and Applied Learning; Discourse and Content of the Field)

  • Students will evaluate media history form cultural, technological, and economic perspectives
  • Students will apply economic data or media analytics to make strategic decisions.
  • Students will produce and analyze professional quality products (e.g., press kits, ads, media campaigns) that address client needs

2: Students will consider both ethics and issues of diversity and global awareness to inform strategic decisions. (Aligns with ACLOs: Ethical Reasoning; Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion)

  • Students will analyze ethical decision making in the media industry as it reflects issues of race, class, global cultures, and/or gender.
  • Students will demonstrate the ability to prepare and present an oral presentation in a way that displays an understanding of their audience and confidence in their delivery.

3: Students will have strong verbal and presentation skills. (Aligns with ACLO: Written, Oral, and Visual Communication)

4: Students will have strong skills in writing. (Aligns with ACLO: Written, Oral, and Visual Communication)

  • Students will write grammatically correct and in the appropriate professional manner with a specific purpose for an intended audience.
  • Students will develop an understanding of the formal (Aesthetic) aspects of design and visual communication.
  • Students will demonstrate cross-platform (print, broadcast, web, mobile) storytelling skills.

5: Students will demonstrate skills in visual production and communication technologies. (Aligns with ACLO: Discourse and Content of the Field)

Modern Languages

1: Develop written and oral proficiency in the target language consistent with the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency rating for a given level. (Aligns with ACLO: Discourse and Content of the Field)

  • Communicate effectively orally in the target language to be easily understood by natives of the target language not accustomed to communicating with language learners and on a variety of (un)familiar topics.
  • Write in the target language in formal expository prose without grammatical errors that impede communication.

2: Understand the history and cultures of French- and Spanish-speaking countries and peoples in a global context. (Aligns with ACLOs: Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion; Discourse and Content of the Field)

  • Use the four communicative skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) and cultural awareness to interact and study in a target country.
  • Understand in an informed manner the societies and cultures of the target language.
  • Identify, describe, and compare cultural and/or historical differences by developing relevant examples and articulating their significance.

3: Demonstrate the ability to think critically through thesis-driven analyses and interpretation of a variety of cultural texts including literature, film, plastic arts, and music. (Aligns with ACLOs: Inquiry and Analysis; Written, Oral, and Visual Communication)

  • Interpret and analyze a variety of primary cultural texts in the target language in their historical and cultural contexts.
  • Research, interpret, and successfully defend a thesis-driven analysis of a variety of primary cultural texts in the target language in their historical and cultural contexts using critical resources.
  • Demonstrates an understanding of key literary movements of the target language.
Philosophy

1: Analyze, interpret and understand philosophical texts and discourse (Aligns with ACLO: Inquiry and Analysis)

  • Identify and describe the main aim(s) and assumptions of a text or thinker
  • Separate understanding a text from evaluating a text
  • Summarize and explicate the main support from the conclusion(s) of an argument
  • Identify key terms for analysis

2: Philosophical Knowledge and Methodology (Aligns with ACLO: Discourse and Content of the Field)

  • Demonstrate fluency with the major traditions, figures, concepts, and methods of philosophy
  • Explain the methodology of philosophy compared to other disciplines
  • Distinguish a priori and empirical claims Understand key concepts in areas of philosophy
  • Connect areas of philosophy
  • Demonstrate fluency with major historical traditions in philosophy

3: Ethical Knowledge and Integrity (Aligns with ACLO: Ethical Reasoning)

  • Be aware of other major ethical traditions and be able to apply them to their personal and professional lives
  • Explore frameworks of meaning and value within philosophical traditions
  • Explore connections between personal and societal values and practices
  • Identify similarities and differences among philosophical systems

4: Communication (Aligns with ACLO: Written, Oral, and Visual Communication)

  • Develop, organize and express ideas in a precise, clear, effective, and systematic manner
  • Research, plan and structure a philosophical paper
  • Use formal and informal logic to make and analyze arguments
  • Formulate arguments for and against a position
  • Reach and convey well-reasoned conclusions
Psychology

1: Knowledge Base in Psychology. (Aligns with ACLOs: Discourse and Content of the Field; Integrative and Applied Learning)

  • Describe key concepts, principles, and overarching themes in psychology
  • Develop a working knowledge of psychology's content domains
  • Describe applications of psychology

2: Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking. The skills in this domain involve the development of scientific reasoning and problem solving, including effective research methods. (Aligns with ACLOs: Inquiry and Analysis; Integrative and Applied Learning)

  • Use scientific reasoning to interpret psychological phenomena
  • Demonstrate psychology information literacy
  • Engage in innovative and integrative thinking and problem solving
  • Interpret, design, and conduct basic psychological re
  • Incorporate sociocultural factors in scientific inquiry

3: Ethical and Social Responsibility in a Diverse World. The skills in this domain involve the development of ethically and socially responsible behaviors for professional and personal settings in a landscape that involves increasing diversity. (Aligns with ACLOs: Ethical Reasoning, Citizenship and Civic Engagement; Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion)

  • Apply ethical standards to evaluate psychological science and practice
  • Build and enhance interpersonal relationships
  • Adopt values that build community at local, national, and global levels

4: Communication. Students should demonstrate competence in writing and in oral and interpersonal communication skills. (Aligns with ACLOs: Written, Oral, and Visual Communication; Collaboration and Leadership)

  • Demonstrate effective writing for different purposes
  • Exhibit effective presentation skills for different purposes
  • Interact effectively with others

5: Professional Development. The emphasis in this goal is on application of psychology-specific content and skills, effective self-reflection, project-management skills, teamwork skills, and career preparation. (Aligns with ACLOs: Collaboration and Leadership; Discourse and Content of the Field)

  • Apply psychological content and skills to career goals
  • Exhibit self-efficacy and self-regulation
  • Refine project-management skills
  • Enhance teamwork capacity
  • Develop meaningful professional direction for life after graduation
Religious Studies

1: Explore the “big questions” of life (Aligns with ACLO: Discourse and Content of the Field)

  • Summarize at least two alternative theories or narratives of the sacred or the divine
  • Explain at least two theories of evil, suffering, or sin
  • Express human purpose or meaning through the lens of at least one tradition

2: Understand the basic phenomenology of religion (Aligns with ACLO: Inquiry and Analysis)

  • Identify foundational stories, myths, and language of at least one tradition
  • Identify ritual dimensions of religious traditions in sacred texts or practice
  • Explain how religion functions to establish personal and group identity

3: Understand religious traditions from a variety of perspectives (Aligns with ACLO: Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion)

  • Respectfully represent foundational religious narratives and practices of a tradition other than the student’s own
  • Compare differing ethical traditions (within or among religious and cultural groups)
  • Articulate how race, class, gender, sex or orientation informs religious text, theme or issue

4: Ethically aware and socially responsible in their personal and professional lives (Aligns with ACLO: Ethical Reasoning)

  • Participate in and reflect upon their own and others’ learning
  • Engage others in conversation and practice
  • Identify the social value of claims made
  • Show familiarity with sources of moral authority and guidance

5: Develop critical thinking skills (Aligns with ACLO: Written, Oral, and Visual Communication)

  • Present a paper or report (orally and in writing) with clarity and coherence in accord with academic standards
  • Read and analyze religious and scholarly texts and/or practices
  • Identify religious or theological assumptions in texts (narrative, discursive) and/or practices
  • Articulate practical applications of one’s learning
Sociology

1: Expose students to the fundamental concepts, theories, values, perspectives and methodological traditions that comprise sociology as a discipline (Aligns with ACLOs: Discourse and Content of the Field; Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion)

  • Demonstrate an understanding of core concepts and theories within the discipline
  • Recognize and reflect on core values and beliefs within the discipline
  • Analyze and apply core methodological traditions within the discipline

2: Cultivate engaged, critical thinking that contributes to life-long, intellectual flexibility (Aligns with ACLOs: Integrative and Applied Learning; Inquiry and Analysis)

  • Analyze, interpret, and apply critical perspectives within the discipline
Sport Management

Standards of the Commission on Sport Management Accreditation

1: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the foundational knowledge required for the sport management profession. (Aligns with ACLO: Discourse and Content of the Field)

2: Students will demonstrate information literacy.

3: Students will practice college-level writing and learn industry appropriate formatting. (Aligns with ACLO: Written, Oral, and Visual Communication)

4: Students will demonstrate competency in presentations. (Aligns with ACLO: Written, Oral, and Visual Communication)

5: Students will satisfactorily complete applied learning assignments by practicing the role of industry professionals. (Aligns with ACLO: Integrative and Applied Learning)

6: Students will employ networking skills in experiential opportunities. (Aligns with ACLOs: Citizenship and Civic Engagement; Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion)

Statistics

1: Statistical Methods and Theory: Students will demonstrate competency in designing studies, using graphical and statistical methods to explore data, fitting and evaluating statistical models, using inference procedures including resampling methods, and drawing appropriate conclusions from the analysis. (Aligns with ACLOs: Inquiry and Analysis, Ethical Reasoning, Content and Discourse of the Field)

  • Outcome 1.1: Design a study capable of testing a causal hypothesis and explain how study design is related to evidence for and conclusions about a hypothesis.
  • Outcome 1.2: Use graphical methods to summarize univariate and bivariate distributions and develop insights through graphical data summaries.
  • Outcome 1.3: Demonstrate competency in fitting and interpreting statistical models for both continuous and categorical outcome variables.
  • Outcome 1.4: Use resampling methods for statistical inference, including parameter estimation and hypothesis testing.

2: Data Science: Students will demonstrate competence in statistical programming, algorithmic thinking, simulation-based statistical techniques, and skills for managing and manipulating data and doing reproducible statistical science. (Aligns with ACLOs: Ethical Reasoning, Content and Discourse of the Field)

  • Outcome 2.1: Develop fluency in one statistical programming language and gain familiarity with a second language.
  • Outcome 2.2: Translate a data analytic problem into a set of computational steps, and show how they work in real data.
  • Outcome 2.3: Set up and run a Monte Carlo or simulation study to investigate a problem.
  • Outcome 2.4: Import, clean, and appropriately format data from a variety of sources.

3: Mathematical Foundations: Students will demonstrate competence in calculus and linear algebra and the mathematical foundations of probability and statistics. Emphasis is on connections between mathematical concepts and statistical applications. (Aligns with ACLO: Content and Discourse of the Field)

  • Outcome 3.1: Demonstrate knowledge of integration and differentiation.
  • Outcome 3.2: Demonstrate knowledge of linear algebra (emphasis on matrix manipulations, linear transformations, projections in Euclidean space, eigenvalue/eigenvector decomposition, and singular value decomposition)
  • Outcome 3.3: Demonstrate knowledge of probability (emphasis on conditional probability and independence, random variables, functions and sums of random variables, moment-generating functions, Markov chains and other probability models, Monte Carlo methods, and applications of conditional probability).

4: Statistical Practice and Problem Solving: Students will demonstrate the ability to communicate, collaborate, and manage a data analytic project. Students will show the ability to address real research problems using an array of statistical tools and draw appropriate conclusions.(Aligns with ACLOs: Inquiry and Analysis, Ethical Reasoning, Written, Oral, and Visual Communication, Content and Discourse of the Field, Collaboration and Leadership)

  • Outcome 4.1: Present the findings of a data analytic project, demonstrating writing, speaking, and presentation skills.
  • Outcome 4.2: Plan and collaborate with others on a project designed to answer a disciplinary question using real data.
  • Outcome 4.3: Demonstrate competence with using multiple models and methods for addressing a question in real data, and draw appropriate conclusions.

5: Discipline-Specific Knowledge: Students will become familiar with a disciplinary field of inquiry, demonstrate competence with the quantitative methods used in that field, and apply statistical reasoning to disciplinary questions and problems from that field. (Aligns with ACLOs: Ethical Reasoning, Content and Discourse of the Field, Integrative and Applied Learning)

  • Outcome 5.1: Acquire a minor or second major in a discipline that uses quantitative research methods.
  • Outcome 5.2: Render a disciplinary research question or problem in statistical and computational terms.
  • Outcome 5.3: Conduct a project that addresses a disciplinary question with real data from that field.
Sustainability

1: Recognize and apply an understanding of sustainability from a broad variety of perspectives. (Aligns with ACLOs: Citizenship and Civic Engagement; Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion; Written, Oral, and Visual Communication)

  • Develop an understanding of multiple sustainability frameworks and apply their use within our society.
  • Distinguish the influence of cultural differences on society’s environmental challenges, including but not limited to political, economic, and business pressures, and ethical perspectives.
  • Communicate complex issues in an understandable and persuasive way through writing, speaking, and other forms of public discourse.

2: Develop the capacity for integrative thinking and problem-solving approaches. (Aligns with ACLOs: Inquiry and Analysis; Integrative and Applied Learning)

  • Critically evaluate potential solutions to complex problems from individual to global scales
  • Develop an integrative understanding of the interaction between the natural, built, and social environments of our planet utilizing evidence-based sources.
  • Define and contextualize sustainability issues utilizing multiple methods. Develop skills for the collection, analysis, and application of data.

3: Create an effective solution to a sustainability issue with a community partner. (Aligns with ACLOs: Citizenship and Civic Engagement; Collaboration and Leadership)

  • Apply theoretical frameworks to address a sustainability issue in the community.
  • Develop informed environmental, ethical, economic, and cultural perspectives on a community problem.
  • Apply problem-solving and project management techniques to address a specific community need.

School of Business

Undergraduate Business

1.Core Business Knowledge: Graduates will be knowledgeable in the functional and related areas of business.

  • 1.1. Graduates will demonstrate basic knowledge of Accounting
  • 1.2. Graduates will demonstrate basic knowledge of Organizational Behavior
  • 1.3. Graduates will demonstrate basic knowledge of Operations Management
  • 1.4. Graduates will demonstrate basic knowledge of Finance
  • 1.5. Graduates will demonstrate basic knowledge of Marketing
  • 1.6. Graduates will demonstrate basic knowledge of Legal Environment of Business
  • 1.7. Graduates will demonstrate basic knowledge of Information Technology
  • 1.8. Graduates will demonstrate basic knowledge of International Business
  • 1.9. Graduates will demonstrate basic knowledge of Strategy

2. Effective Communication: Graduates will develop effective communication skills.

  • 2.1. Graduates will write in a manner consistent with professional standards
  • 2.2. Graduates will prepare and deliver effective oral business presentations

3. Collaboration: Graduates will work effectively in teams in order to accomplish team objectives.

  • 3.1. Team Participation - Graduates will accept and carry out their responsibilities and will not engage in “social loafing” behaviors
  • 3.2. Team Cohesiveness - Graduates will contribute to creating a cohesive team atmosphere
  • 3.3. Communication in Teams - Graduates will engage in effective two-way communication
  • 3.4. Group Decision Making - Graduates will use behaviors that facilitate effective group decision-making

4. Graduates will be able to apply a framework of ethical decision making to business problems and issues.

  • 4.1. Graduates will use an ethical decision-making framework to identify and resolve ethical dilemmas

5. Critical Thinking: Graduates will demonstrate proficiency in areas such as complex problem solving, logical reasoning, and idea generation for making business-related decisions.

  • 5.1 Graduates will apply functional business knowledge to make business decisions.
  • 5.2 Graduates will be able to evaluate the quality and sufficiency of information and use that information to solve real-world problems as well as produce innovative outcomes.
Master of Business Administration (MBA)

1. Leadership: Graduates will demonstrate the capacity to lead in organizational situations.

  • 1.1. Graduates will understand their personal strengths and limitations in practicing leadership, which will enable them to further develop their leadership capabilities.
  • 1.2. Graduates will show leadership initiative by actively attempting to influence events to achieve goals.

2. Communication: Graduates will demonstrate the capacity to communicate effectively in organizational situations.

  • 2.1. Graduates will write appropriately for a business situation.
  • 2.2. Graduates will communicate effectively in a formal presentation setting.
  • 2.3. Graduates will effectively express their ideas in a team setting.

3. Application of Business Knowledge: Graduates will apply business knowledge to critically analyze business problems and to make decisions in an effective manner.

  • 3.1. Graduates will apply knowledge of marketing, business strategy, integrated accounting and finance, and project management to critically analyze business-related problems.
  • 3.2. Graduates will apply knowledge of marketing, business strategy, integrated accounting and finance, and project management to make effective business decisions based on relevant data.

4. Teamwork: Graduates will foster collaboration among team members by showing respect for others, encouraging open expression of ideas, and contributing to the overall effectiveness of a team.

  • 4.1. Graduates will seek input from others and validate their contributions to the team.
  • 4.2. Graduates will encourage open expression of ideas.
  • 4.3. Graduates will contribute to the team in helping to achieve its goals.

Ralph C. Wilson, Jr. School of Education

Undergraduate Inclusive Education

The learning outcomes for the teacher preparation programs offered by the School of Education/PEU are aligned with the New York state standards for teacher preparation and the Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (INTASC) standards. The School of Education/PEU's learning outcomes are:

  • Planning: Candidates understand the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the discipline(s) they teach and can create learning experiences that make these aspects of the subject matter meaningful for students.
  • Development: Candidates understand how children learn and develop and can provide learning opportunities that support their intellectual, social, and personal development.
  • Diversity: Candidates know, understand, and appreciate diversity and demonstrate this by creating learning experiences that honor diversity.
  • Content: Candidates have command of the content area(s) they are to teach as defined by the state and national standards and create learning opportunities that are meaningful to their students.
  • Leadership: Candidates demonstrate leadership in a multitude of ways. Leaders initiate and implement new ideas to improve the quality of education in the classroom, district, and society.
  • Theory and Practice: Candidates demonstrate an emerging philosophical and theoretical framework to become effective educators. This is demonstrated through an iterative process of reflection, decision making, and practice.
  • Management: Candidates understand that effective classroom management is a blend of effective instruction, attention to effective elements, organization, and myriad other factors, as well as the ability to effectively balance these variables.
  • Assessment: Candidates understand and use formal and informal assessment strategies to evaluate and ensure the continuous intellectual, social, and physical development of the learner.
  • Professionalism: Candidates demonstrate dispositions, behaviors, and social skills that reflect professionalism.
  • Community: Candidates foster relationships with school colleagues, parents, and agencies in the larger community to support students’ learning and well-being.
  • Technology: Candidates use technology to foster active inquiry, collaboration, and supportive interaction in the classroom.
Master of Science in Special Education: Adolescence (Grades 7-12) (M.S.)

Upon completion of the teacher education programs, candidates will be able to address:

  • Learner Development. The teacher understands how learners grow and develop, recognizing that patterns of learning and development vary individually within and across the cognitive, linguistic, social, emotional, and physical areas, and designs and implements developmentally appropriate and challenging learning experiences.
  • Learning Differences. The teacher uses an understanding of individual differences and diverse cultures and communities to ensure inclusive learning environments that enable each learner to meet high standards.
  • Learning Environments. The teacher works with others to create environments that support individual and collaborative learning and encourage positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation.
  • Content Knowledge. The teacher understands the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the discipline(s) he or she teaches and creates learning experiences that make the discipline accessible and meaningful for learners to assure mastery of the content.
  • Application of Content. The teacher understands how to connect concepts and use differing perspectives to engage learners in critical thinking, creativity, and collaborative problem solving related to authentic local and global issues.
  • Assessment. The teacher understands and uses multiple methods of assessment to engage learners in their own growth, monitor learner progress, and guide the teacher’s and learner’s decision making.
  • Planning for Instruction. The teacher plans instruction that supports every student in meeting rigorous learning goals by drawing upon knowledge of content areas, curriculum, cross-disciplinary skills, and pedagogy, as well as knowledge of learners and the community context.
  • Instructional Strategies. The teacher understands and uses a variety of instructional strategies to encourage learners to develop deep understanding of content areas and their connections, as well as build skills to apply knowledge in meaningful ways.
  • Professional Learning and Ethical Practice. The teacher engages in ongoing professional learning and uses evidence to continually evaluate his/her practice, particularly the effects of his/her choices and actions on others (learners, families, other professionals, and the community), and adapts practice to meet the needs of each learner.
  • Leadership and Collaboration. The teacher seeks appropriate leadership roles and opportunities to take responsibility for student learning and to collaborate with learners, families, colleagues, other school professionals, and community members to ensure learner growth and advance the profession.
  • Theory and Practice: Candidates will demonstrate an understanding of the philosophical underpinnings, theories, and best practices that promote high-quality teaching and learning environments for all students.
Master of Science in Special Education: Childhood (Grades 1-6) (M.S.)

Upon completion of the teacher education programs, candidates will be able to address:

  • Learner Development. The teacher understands how learners grow and develop, recognizing that patterns of learning and development vary individually within and across the cognitive, linguistic, social, emotional, and physical areas, and designs and implements developmentally appropriate and challenging learning experiences.
  • Learning Differences. The teacher uses an understanding of individual differences and diverse cultures and communities to ensure inclusive learning environments that enable each learner to meet high standards.
  • Learning Environments. The teacher works with others to create environments that support individual and collaborative learning and encourage positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation.
  • Content Knowledge. The teacher understands the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the discipline(s) he or she teaches and creates learning experiences that make the discipline accessible and meaningful for learners to assure mastery of the content.
  • Application of Content. The teacher understands how to connect concepts and use differing perspectives to engage learners in critical thinking, creativity, and collaborative problem solving related to authentic local and global issues.
  • Assessment. The teacher understands and uses multiple methods of assessment to engage learners in their own growth, monitor learner progress, and guide the teacher’s and learner’s decision making.
  • Planning for Instruction. The teacher plans instruction that supports every student in meeting rigorous learning goals by drawing upon knowledge of content areas, curriculum, cross-disciplinary skills, and pedagogy, as well as knowledge of learners and the community context.
  • Instructional Strategies. The teacher understands and uses a variety of instructional strategies to encourage learners to develop a deep understanding of content areas and their connections, as well as build skills to apply knowledge in meaningful ways.
  • Professional Learning and Ethical Practice. The teacher engages in ongoing professional learning and uses evidence to continually evaluate his/her practice, particularly the effects of his/her choices and actions on others (learners, families, other professionals, and the community), and adapts practice to meet the needs of each learner.
  • Leadership and Collaboration. The teacher seeks appropriate leadership roles and opportunities to take responsibility for student learning and to collaborate with learners, families, colleagues, other school professionals, and community members to ensure learner growth, and to advance the profession.
  • Theory and Practice: Candidates will demonstrate an understanding of the philosophical underpinnings, theories, and best practices that promote high-quality teaching and learning environments for all students.
School Library Media Specialist

In the area of Learners and Learning candidates will:

  • Understand the growth and development process of learners and foster student agency
  • Embrace cultural diversity and create an inclusive, culturally responsive environment for all learners
  • Develop professional relationships with, and honor differences among, diverse learners within a learning community
  • Seek opportunities to promote equity and social justice within the learning community
  • Design appropriate and engaging instructional environments, both physical and virtual

In the area of Planning for Instruction candidates will:

  • Design learning experiences which meet multiple learning goals within mutually beneficial collaborative partnerships
  • Choose instructional strategies to provide learners with multiple avenues to demonstrate learning
  • Model information evaluation strategies and ethical use of information
  • Design varied assessment opportunities for learners to demonstrate knowledge and mastery
  • Continually review and revise instruction with collaborative partners to improve learner outcomes

In the area of Knowledge and Application of Content candidates will:

  • Promote reading as a foundational skill for lifelong learning, personal enjoyment, and growth
  • Develop knowledge of selection procedures and curation issues related to the development of diverse, accessible and culturally relevant collections in multiple formats
  • Curate a wide range of information literacy skills to define information needs; seek, find and evaluate information; and convey information ethically
  • Design inquiry experiences which promote critical thinking as learners demonstrate multiple literacies
  • Incorporate relevant use of technology to enhance learning experiences and build learner awareness of the digital environment
  • Utilize instructional strategies which convey the importance of digital citizenship in a technology-enabled environment

In the area of Organization and Access candidates will:

  • Support models which maximize learners’ access to library resources and services
  • Recognize and design functional solutions which reduce barriers to equitable access
  • Develop and curate collections which reflect the continually changing nature of both the information environment and the needs of the learning community
  • Use data and information in the decision-making process within the learning community

In the area of Leadership, Advocacy, and Professional Responsibility candidates will:

  • Conduct strategic development, implementation and ongoing evaluation of a library media program aligned with the school’s vision
  • Engage in the professional development cycle as learners and facilitators
  • Lead and collaborate with others in the school community to design solutions to identified problems
  • Manage fiscal and personnel procedures and issues within the library media program
  • Advocate for the implementation of innovative learning modalities, such as making, tinkering, iterative and design thinking
  • Network with the larger community to advocate for learners and the learning community
  • Model, promote and practice ethical use of information and intellectual freedom
Master of Science in Education: Educational Leadership (M.S.Ed.)

The learning outcomes of these programs are to produce school leaders who possess the following attributes:

  • Have a thorough grounding in and understanding of the challenges and opportunities in education
  • Have the ability to work effectively with members of the school district and local community
  • Demonstrate effective leadership, management, and communication skills, and are agents for effective and positive change
  • Have a strong sense of ethics and ethical responsibility to the children and families served by the school and school district
  • Have a broad understanding of the role of the school/district and its relationship to the broader community in which it operates
  • Have a broad awareness and knowledge of curriculum issues, Educational Leadership Constituent Council (ELCC) standards, and Common Core learning standards and assessment program
  • Are prepared based on state and national leadership standards and assessments for school building and district leaders
  • Are knowledgeable about and committed to teaching and learning principles that support effective classroom practices and procedures based on the developmental learning needs of P–12 students and state learning standards
  • Are knowledgeable about educational research, research techniques, and interpretation of research findings in education
  • Have a general understanding of educational technology and its applications in research, communication, and instruction
  • Can design and implement effective programs for faculty and staff development
  • Have an understanding of education law, finance, and the legal issues facing schools and school districts
  • Have the knowledge and skills related to a school leader’s responsibility to establish a school or district budget, and provide the necessary fiscal oversight required to support achievement of planned educational objectives and goals
Doctorate in Education: Executive Leadership (Ed.D.)

The program will prepare executive leaders who demonstrate the following:

  • The ability to apply and synthesize the essential knowledge, skills, and dispositions required for effective leadership and management in various organizational settings
  • The capability to conduct research and collect, analyze, and interpret data to inform decision making and improve performance
  • The facility to think and plan strategically and conduct action research that is supported by best practice
  • An understanding of the impact, interactions, and implications of various public sectors on organizations
  • The integrity to make ethical and fair decisions when facing moral dilemmas.
  • The capacity to appreciate and maximize the talents and skills of a diverse workforce
  • The ability to assess and maximize human potential through a process of continuous personal, professional, and intellectual development

Leadership Standards

Executive leadership is a complex concept represented by an array of knowledge, skills, and dispositions as diverse as the population of successful leaders. Nonetheless, those who emerge from this program will be expected to possess in their character and demonstrate in their actions the seminal values reflected in the standards below. Standard One—Character

The executive leader demonstrates character, drive, competence, and honesty in advancing the goals of the organization and the aspirations of colleagues. The executive leader has a strong moral compass and places the interests of the organization and coworkers before personal gain. Standard Two—Vision

The executive leader has the ability to develop a positive, humane vision of the future that is articulated and communicated to constituents. The executive leader makes a long-term investment in this vision and works collaboratively toward its accomplishment with all stakeholders. Standard Three—Integrity

The executive leader is a person of integrity who acts ethically and fairly in all dealings with others. The executive leader creates an organizational climate of honesty and high principles that inspire principled behavior among all who serve the organization. Standard Four—Self Development

The executive leader continually examines personal strengths and weaknesses and uses knowledge of self in the service of others. The executive leader is introspective and reflective, using personal strength and courage to advance organizational goals while working to diminish personal weaknesses. Standard Five—Support of Others

The executive leader supports, encourages, and rewards others by recognizing their talents and assigning them responsibilities commensurate with their abilities. The executive leader views others as partners who bring to the organization strength and potential for good. Standard Six—Development of Goals

The executive leader identifies and advances the organization’s mission and goals. The executive leader accepts change and enables others to work for and embrace change. Standard Seven—Collaboration

The executive leader collaborates with all organizational constituencies, promoting trust and confidence. The executive leader responds to diverse community interests by partnering with the community and garnering community resources on behalf of the organization and community advancement. Standard Eight—Research and Best Practice

The executive leader’s knowledge of professional practice is current and shaped by research and experience. The executive leader employs best practice in the performance of duties, revises practice and programs based on empirical data, and fosters commitment to these principles in others. Standard Nine—Cultural Sensitivity and Diversity

The executive leader understands, respects, and values individuals from diverse cultural backgrounds and with different experiences. The executive leader possesses and promotes knowledge of diversity within the organization, community, and broader society; demonstrates dispositions that respect and value differences; and exhibits skills for working in diverse organizational settings. Standard Ten—Communication Skills and Technology

The executive leader demonstrates effective communication skills in writing and speaking, as well as through the use of technology and electronic media. The executive leader communicates with all constituencies in clear, intelligible language designed to promote community involvement and support while advancing the organization’s mission and goals. Standard Eleven—Responsibility and Accountability

The executive leader assumes and shares responsibility and accountability for achievement of organizational goals and outcomes. The executive leader clearly defines organizational roles and objectively measures employee performance in the context of the organization’s mission and goals. Standard Twelve—Organizational Capacity and Improvement

The executive leader knows how to synthesize and apply research, knowledge, and experience to inform change and increase organizational capacity. The executive leader embraces and promotes ongoing professional development, as well as continuous individual and organizational improvement.

Wegmans School of Nursing

Traditional Undergraduate Nursing

Upon completion of the Bachelor of Science in Nursing, the graduate will be prepared to:

  • Integrate the liberal arts and sciences and nursing courses to promote holistic outcomes for clients.
  • Support interprofessional communication and collaboration for improving client health outcomes.
  • Advocate for clients and support their right to safe, compassionate, and holistic nursing care.
  • Integrate critical thinking and decision-making throughout the nursing process to improve the care of clients.
  • Practice as a responsible member of the nursing profession reflecting current standards of practice including ethical and legal accountability.
  • Apply basic organizational and systems leadership for quality care and patient safety in the provision and management of health care.
  • Practice patient-centered care respectfully and nonjudgmentally with diverse populations of individuals, families, and communities.
  • Engage in ongoing, self-directed learning, self-evaluation, and goal setting throughout their nursing career.
  • Engage in the scholarship of evidence-based practice and research to support high-quality health outcomes and safe nursing care.
  • Promote clinical prevention and population health based on an understanding of global health care issues.
  • Use information management systems and apply patient care technologies for clinical decision-making.
Online RN-to-BS Nursing

Upon completion of the Bachelor of Science in Nursing, the graduate will be prepared to:

  • Integrate the liberal arts and sciences and nursing courses to promote holistic outcomes for clients.
  • Support interprofessional communication and collaboration for improving client health outcomes.
  • Advocate for clients and support their right to safe, compassionate, and holistic nursing care.
  • Integrate critical thinking and decision-making throughout the nursing process to improve the care of clients.
  • Practice as a responsible member of the nursing profession reflecting current standards of practice including ethical and legal accountability.
  • Apply basic organizational and systems leadership for quality care and patient safety in the provision and management of health care.
  • Practice patient-centered care respectfully and nonjudgmentally with diverse populations of individuals, families, and communities.
  • Engage in ongoing, self-directed learning, self-evaluation, and goal setting throughout their nursing career.
  • Engage in the scholarship of evidence-based practice and research to support high-quality health outcomes and safe nursing care.
  • Promote clinical prevention and population health based on an understanding of global health care issues.
  • Use information management systems and apply patient care technologies for clinical decision-making.
Advanced Practice Nursing

Upon completion of the Master of Science in Advanced Practice Nursing Program, the graduate will be prepared to:

  • Synthesize knowledge from nursing and related disciplines to design, implement, and
    evaluate health services, educational offerings, program resources, and research.
  • Engage in multidisciplinary communication to facilitate intervention systems, scientific inquiry, education, and collaboration/negotiation that will positively influence healthcare outcomes.
  • Provide and advocate for compassionate, high-quality, cost-effective, holistic advanced practice nursing care in diverse settings within communities and health systems.
  • Use evidence-based intervention and educational strategies to promote, maintain, restore health, or provide end-of-life care.
  • Integrate into role implementation the legal principles and the professional and ethical values essential to advanced practice nursing.
  • Serve as a leader in advancing healthcare by promoting expert nursing practice and education through collegial relationships.
  • Promote practice and education models that are respectful of diversity and pluralism and are based on knowledge of the policies and political issues that influence outcomes of care.
  • Develop a personal advanced practice model that incorporates a commitment to lifelong learning and the advancement of the art and science of nursing.
  • Engage in the development of contemporary nursing strategies and models which reflect emerging nursing practice.
Mental Health Counseling

Upon completion of the mental health counseling program, the graduate will be prepared to:

  • Demonstrate professional skills and personal qualities required for working as an effective counselor in an interdisciplinary mental health setting.
  • Demonstrate a variety of differential diagnostic assessment skills consistent with the most current diagnostic manual.
  • Demonstrate the ability to use a diverse range of evidence-based intervention strategies.
  • Develop appropriate intervention plans based upon knowledge of culturally relevant variables in client care, including ethnicity, religion, socioeconomic levels, gender, sexual orientation, and disability status.
  • Demonstrate professional behavior consistent with ethical guidelines of mental health counseling professional organizations and regulatory agencies.
Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP)

Upon completion of the Doctor of Nursing Practice Program, the graduate will be prepared to:

  • Implement and evaluate clinical practice based on scientific knowledge.
  • Assume advanced practice nursing roles as an expert clinician.
  • Demonstrate advanced leadership skills necessary to meet the challenges of increasingly complex healthcare organizations.
  • Demonstrate analytical methodologies for the evaluation of clinical practice and the application of scientific evidence to improve professional practice.
  • Apply clinical scholarship methodologies for organizational quality improvement, evidence-based practice, and healthcare outcomes.
  • Use advanced skills to design, develop, and implement the use of contemporary technological information systems.
  • Demonstrate expertise in the analysis, formulation, and implementation of healthcare policy.
  • Collaborate with interdisciplinary teams necessary to meet the healthcare needs of individuals and populations.
  • Apply ethical theories, legal and practice standards, and advocacy to decision-making in healthcare issues.
  • Apply population-based methodologies for health promotion and disease-prevention in advanced practice.

Wegmans School of Pharmacy

Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.)

The Wegmans School of Pharmacy has adopted the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) Educational Outcomes as articulated by the Center for the Advancement of Pharmacy Education (CAPE) 2013.

Upon completion of the Pharm.D. program and entry into the profession, graduates will be able to demonstrate the following skills and attributes:

Domain 1: Foundational Knowledge

1.1. Learner (Learner): Develop, integrate, and apply knowledge from the foundational sciences (i.e. Pharmaceutical, social/behavioral/administrative, and clinical sciences) to evaluate the scientific literature, explain drug action, solve therapeutic problems, and advance population health and patient-centered care.

Domain 2: Essentials for Practice and Care

2.1. Patient-centered care (Caregiver): Provide patient-centered care as the medication expert (collect and interpret evidence, prioritize, formulate assessments and recommendations, implement, monitor and adjust plans, and document activities).

2.2. Medication use systems management (Manager): Manage patient healthcare needs using human, financial, technological, and physical resources to optimize the safety and efficacy of medication use systems.

2.3. Health and wellness (Promoter): Design prevention, intervention, and educational strategies for individuals and communities to manage chronic disease and improve health and wellness.

2.4. Population-based care (Provider): Describe how population-based care influences patient-centered care and influences the development of practice guidelines and evidence-based best practices.

Domain 3: Approach to Practice and Care

3.1. Problem solving (Problem Solver): Identify problems; explore and prioritize potential strategies; and design, implement, and evaluate a viable solution.

3.2. Educator (Educator): Educate all audiences by determining the most effective and enduring ways to impart information and assess understanding.

3.3. Patient advocacy (Advocate): Assure that patients’ best interests are represented.

3.4. Interprofessional collaboration (Collaborator): Actively participate and engage as a healthcare team member by demonstrating mutual respect, understanding, and values to meet patient care needs.

3.5. Cultural sensitivity (Includer): Recognize social determinants of health to diminish disparities and inequities in access to quality care.

3.6. Communication (Communicator): Effectively communicate verbally and nonverbally when interacting with an individual, group, or organization.

Domain 4: Personal and Professional Development

4.1. Self-awareness (Self-aware): Examine and reflect on personal knowledge, skills, abilities, beliefs, biases, motivation, and emotions that could enhance or limit personal and professional growth.

4.2. Leadership (Leader): Demonstrate responsibility for creating and achieving shared goals, regardless of position.

4.3. Innovation and entrepreneurship (Innovator): Engage in innovative activities by using creative thinking to envision better ways of accomplishing professional goals.

4.4. Professionalism (Professional): Exhibit behaviors and values that are consistent with the trust given to the profession by patients, other healthcare providers, and society.